Friday, December 30, 2005

Americans Hunt Canadians

Got your attention didn't it. No its not Calvuto or Mr. Tackie Bow Tie Tucker Carlson loading up their guns in the back of the SUV and heading North looking for Canadian 'stalkers' to blast. Nope its Canadian Grey Wolves.

The U.S. introduced Canadian wolves into their national parks since they had destroyed their own indigenous population, along with Buffalo and Indians. And the population has grown over the last decade so in their divine wisdom the Environmentalists in the Bush Administration are now allowing States to regulate Wolf hunting.

Which means that the corruptible State legislatures will kowtow to the rancher lobby and of course allow for varmit hunting of wolves, even if the empirical evidence and science
(drat there's them damn intecelshuals interfering in the nature of things again) says that the wolves have not harmed farm animals.

But of course the U.S. is only catching up with Canada, which allows the provinces to determine the fate of the animals in their geographic domain. Alberta for instance still has an annual wolf hunt. So we would be hypocritical to complain that the Wolves we shipped them ten years ago are now going to be open season for Yankee hunters. Unless we suggested it was wrong for them to hunt them when they could come up here and pay us for the thrill. Yep there's a sick logic to that.


New threat as wolves make comeback

· Protections eased after big increase in numbers
· Environment groups fear backlash by ranchers


Julian Borger in Washington
Thursday December 29, 2005
The Guardian


Licences to kill wolves are to be granted by state authorities rather than Washington. Photograph: Staffan Widstrand/Corbis
Licences to kill wolves are to be granted by state authorities rather than Washington. Photograph: Staffan Widstrand/Corbis


America's wolves have climbed back from the edge of extinction in the past 10 years to the point where the federal government is about to relinquish responsibility for their protection. But environmentalists say the wolf is not quite out of the woods and warn that the human backlash against the predator has only just begun.

About 5,000 wolves - mainly Canadian greys - now roam the woods of Minnesota and the American west, compared with a population of barely 200 in the mid-90s, before the animals were reintroduced to Yellowstone national park.

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